Teaser Tuesday (Mar-5)

TeaserTuesdayTeaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Should Be Reading. Share the title and author, so others can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
Grab your current read
Open to a random page
Share two (2) “teaser” sentences.

BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS!!!

 

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Were she better or you sicker, then the stars would not be so terribly crossed, but it is the nature of stars to cross, and never was Shakespeare more wrong than when he had Cassius note, “The fault is not in our stars but in ourselves.” Easy enough to say, but there is no shortage of fault to be found amid our stars.

I kept thinking that it sounded like a dragon breathing in time with me, like I had this pet dragon who was cuddled up next to me and cared enough about me to time his breaths to mind.

“Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin. “

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Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green

Will Grayson, Will Grayson almost didn’t get read, but I decided that if you read one you must read them all… and I am glad I did, as this became my favourite of all the books (thus far). It’s about a chance meeting between two teenage boys who have the exact same name and how that meeting leaves an impact on each other’s lives.

I admit that I didn’t always love the characters; in fact I’m not sure I truly liked a single one of them in this book or any of the other novels, yet that is so true to life. You don’t always like everything about everyone, even if they are your best friends. Instead it is more like you grow used to their flaws and accept them, love the person despite their flaws. In the end I realize that I don’t have to like the characters in order to like the book itself.

Levithan’s portion of the book was written in lower-case, something I didn’t like at first but eventually got used to. I like the idea behind the chosen writing style to depict that Will’s perspective, though it didn’t make it any less annoying while reading it. The reason why I preferred Green’s writing (besides the proper use of grammar and punctuation) is that his characters, by comparison, had far more depth and layers… though perhaps I’ve confused who wrote what!

The funny thing is though that neither of the Will Graysons is truly the main character of the book, even though the story is told of the perspectives of these two boys. Instead it is Tiny Cooper: the biggest, gayest, most loveable character in the whole book. He feels the most developed, most three-dimensional being out of everyone, and even when he drives you crazy you kind of wish he was real and you could go see his musical. I don’t understand it, but there is something about flamboyantly gay males that is irresistible to women.

Teaser Tuesday (Mar-4)

TeaserTuesdayTeaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Should Be Reading. Share the title and author, so others can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
Grab your current read
Open to a random page
Share two (2) “teaser” sentences.

BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS!!!

 

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Without Pain, How Could We Know Joy? (This is an old argument in the field of Thinking About Suffering, and its stupidity and lack of sophistication could be plumbed for centuries, but suffice it to say that the existence of broccoli does not in any way affect the taste of chocolate.)

We all miss you so much. It just never ends. It feels like we were all wounded in your battle. I love you.

Looking For Alaska by John Green

Following the many Katherines came Looking for Alaska, which has a very similar premise to Paper Towns. Boy falls for the girl whom he has built up in his imagination only for her to disappear and he needs to figure out what happened.

The story opens with Miles having a need to head into ‘the great perhaps’, something that meshed with my current lifestyle as I had just left home to live in a different country. I too wanted to go on a road trip, move to another place, with the hope that a new location would also mean a new me.

Green did a much better job with Paper Towns than he did with this first novel of his, possibly because he’s had more experience than he had when writing this one. However, one thing remains the same across all the books I’ve read of his: the characters feel flat. There is no depth, no emotional connection the reader can make so that they truly empathize with what unfolds on the pages.

It was only curiosity of what happens next that kept me reading, rather than empathy. I wanted to know what the chapters were counting down to, and what the fallout would be once that date had arrived. Yet even as I wanted to know how the characters would deal with the upheaval that was sure to beset their lives, I didn’t feel sympathetic.

The irony of this is that his characters are far more realistic than can be found in most novels. Those beings are what Green tries to avoid, saying that he likes to play with the idea of chosen identities and given ones. Rather than the building up of people into perfection so that they are no longer themselves but an idealized one—an imaginary one—his characters are flawed.

You never really know everything about your loved ones, which is proved by Miles as he tries to figure out the why of Alaska’s actions. Alaska was a bit more honest than Margo in showing others her true self, but that didn’t mean that she was understood any better by the people in her life. Who others think you to be is ever so different than who you choose to be or whom you really are inside.

Teaser Tuesday (Mar-3)

TeaserTuesdayTeaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Should Be Reading. Share the title and author, so others can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
Grab your current read
Open to a random page
Share two (2) “teaser” sentences.

BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS!!!

*note: these are not quotes from the story, but after it has finished and are in relation to the novel. I liked them so I decided to include them 

Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan

We acknowledge that being the person God made you cannot separate you from God’s love.

A lot of this novel is about the weird relationship between identity and existence: in  some ways you are who you are because other people observe you; but in some ways, you are who you are in spite of other people’s observations of you.

An Abundance of Katherines by John Green

An Abundance of Katherines followed—though I fluctuated between it and the next book in regards to which should be read. Being a little more familiar with Green’s writing style I knew the book would be more on the oddball side than cookie-cutter, happily-ever-after, and thus wasn’t disappointed by what unfolded on the pages.

In the story Colin has a thing for Katherines, and he sets out on a road trip with his bestie to get over being dumped for the nineteenth time. Being the prodigy he is, Colin comes up with a theory that he can discover the reason behind the nineteen failed relationships through the creation of a mathematical equation. It’s downright bizarre, but even the math doesn’t detract from the unique tale.

What I loved about this book was the random facts stored in Colin’s head, and I think that may have been a large part of why the book was so interesting. It may be an annoying trait in real life, yet in this book it is what made Colin a likeable character. With this novel you are given a bunch of absolutely useless information that you’ll likely try to insert into your own conversations.

This book was definitely better than Paper Towns, and it is the book to beat. If I had to recommend a John Green book, this would be the far more likely one. Would I read it again? Probably not, but it will hit the spot if you need a book that is different than the norm.

Teaser Tuesday (Mar-2)

TeaserTuesdayTeaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Should Be Reading. Share the title and author, so others can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
Grab your current read
Open to a random page
Share two (2) “teaser” sentences.

BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS!!!

Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan

Me giving my mom romantic advice is kind of like a goldfish giving a snail advice on how to fly.

“In a way, it’s good. Love and truth being tied together. They make each other possible, you know?”

He hugs me. Imagine being hugged by a sofa. That’s what it feels like.